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6 Minute Conditioning AMRAP

Rudern mit der Kurzhantel

A lifting session is sweat-inducing and heart-pumping, sure. But sometimes you’re left with one last burst of energy. And we know how you should spend it: on this 6 minute AMRAP cash-out. AMRAP stands for “as many rounds as possible.” This one hits three of our favorite fitness disciplines: strength, mobility, and cardio capacity.

The Warm-Up

This AMRAP is designed to be done as the second half of a strength and conditioning session. Which means that if you’re tapped out from your workout, it’s not the time to add this on. No special warmup is necessary for this AMRAP. If your lower body is tight, do some bodyweight squats, runner’s stretches, and hip circles.

The Workout

Put six minutes on a clock. At the beginning of each minute, you’ll do 10 dumbbell rows and 5 Cossack lunges on each leg. Then you’ll use the remainder of time for tuck jumps. Count the number of tuck jumps you do in round one, and your goal is to sustain the same number of tuck jumps for rounds 2 through 6.

#1 Dumbbell row

Stand with feet staggered, left foot forward, knees bent, back flat, holding a medium or heavy dumbbell in each right hand, to start. Hip hinge forward until torso is close to parallel to the floor and pull the right dumbbell close to your rib cage while keeping elbow close to the body, then reverse to start. Do all reps with your right arm and alternate sides between sets.

#2 Cossack lunges

Stand tall with feet next to each other, to start. In one smooth, continuous movement, step your right foot out wide to the right, do a single-leg squat on your right leg while keeping left leg straight, then reverse to start. Repeat on left side. Continue switching sides for all 10 reps.

#3 Tuck jump

Stand tall with feet together to start. Drop into a low squat, then press explosively through your feet and swing arms upward to jump; as you jump, pull knees toward chest and tap knees with your hands. Land softly and immediately drop into the next rep.

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